Random fact: I use Hetman valve oil in my trumpet.

One day when I was thinking about the day of the Sabbath, I decided to write down all the possibilities and the types of texts/statements I would expect to see in the Bible if each one of them were true.

There are five possibilities:
1. The Sabbath has always been a specific day of the week
2. The Sabbath was given as one specific day of the week, but was changed to another day of the week
3. The Sabbath was given as one specific day of the week, but was changed so that it could be kept any day of the week (or not kept at all)
4. The Sabbath could be kept any day of the week since its beginning.
5. The Sabbath could be kept any day of the week since its beginning, but was changed to be a specific day of the week.

The changes mentioned should be found somewhere in the New Testament (mentioned by Jesus or his followers in the early church)

If possibilities four and five were true, I would expect to see texts/statements in the Old Testament (required) or New Testament (optional) mentioning:
-The act of resting (and not a day) blessed.
-God’s people keeping different days throughout the week.
-Reference to “Sabbath days/rests,” and not to “the Sabbath day/rest.” I could see the statement “A Sabbath day/rest” as going both ways.
-Jesus keeping a day (not really specific).

Clearly this is not what is seen in the Scriptures. In Genesis 2:1-3, “God blessed the Sabbath day and sanctified it.” He rested, but instead of blessing the act of resting, he blessed a specific day (the seventh day of the week). In Exodus 16, when God rained manna on Israel, they were to collect manna six days a week, but not collect manna on the Sabbath. When some of the Israelites tried to find manna on the Sabbath, God was displeased. But what if they kept Sabbath on the second or third day of the week? God was specific that the Sabbath mentioned in His commandments and laws was a specific day, the seventh (Exodus 16:28, 29). Any study of the history of the Israel/Jewish nation shows a consistent keeping of the Sabbath on the seventh day of Scripture (Sundown on Friday to sundown on Saturday).

Thus, the only possibilities that remain are numbers one through three.

1. The Sabbath has always been a specific day of the week:
-A specific day was blessed
-God’s people keeping the same Sabbath day holy
-A person/power outside of the Bible changing the day.
-No clear reference/commandment stating any change of solemnity from one day to another (i.e. the seventh day is no longer holy and you can now work; or that this other day is now holy and will be the Sabbath day). God would not give a vague or unclear commandment. The original 10 were very clear and proclaimed in great display from Mt. Sinai.
-Jesus keeping that day.

2. The Sabbath was given as one specific day of the week, but was changed to another day of the week:
-A specific day was blessed
-God’s people keeping the same Sabbath day holy
-A clear reference/commandment stating any change of solemnity from one day to another (i.e. the seventh day is no longer holy and you can now work; this other day is now holy and will be the Sabbath day). God would not give a vague or unclear commandment. The original 10 were very clear and proclaimed in great display from Mt. Sinai.
-Jesus keeping that a day, either the first one or the second one.

3. The Sabbath was given as one specific day of the week, but was changed so that it could be kept any day of the week:
-A specific day was blessed
-God’s people keeping the same Sabbath day holy
-A clear reference/commandment stating any change of solemnity from one day to any day (i.e. the seventh day is no longer holy and you can now work; any day you choose can become your Sabbath day; rest, not a day, is what is important). God would not give a vague or unclear commandment. The original 10 were very clear and proclaimed in great display from Mt. Sinai.
-Jesus keeping a Sabbath day (perhaps the original Sabbath, perhaps not).

We already know how the Bible describes the blessing of the Sabbath day and how it was kept by the Israelites. The real question now is whether or not there was a clear commandment given to change the Sabbath in some way.

Just by way of quick note, the Bible never mentions “the Sabbath of the Jews.” Since the Sabbath was given at Creation, the Sabbath applies to all mankind and the Bible refers to it as “The Sabbath of the LORD/Lord” (Exodus 20:10; Mark 2:28).

Since the Bible doesn’t give any clear commands from God to change the Sabbath (This point seems too short, but I don’t know what else say about this), we’ll check for any evidence of the validity of a seventh day Sabbath in the New Testament before we settle on possibility number 1.

In Luke 4:16 we see that Jesus kept the Sabbath in part by attending church services in Jewish Synagogues which would have been held on the seventh day. Luke 23:52-Luke 24:3 shows that Sabbath day according to the commandment (remember God’s statement in Exodus 16) was on the seventh day, the day before he rose again. Jesus resurrection is celebrated on a Sunday once every year, showing that the seventh day Sabbath (according to the commandment) is roughly on Saturday (sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, specifically).

To avoid making an assumption, Matthew 5:17-18, Romans 7:7, Romans 13:8-10, and James 2:8-12 (among others) all mention that the laws applicable to the Christian today include the 10 commandments. In other words, the 10 commandments have never been done away with by God. Daniel 7 mentions that there would be a kingdom (the little horn) that would intend to (but not actually) change times and law. A proper understanding of this prophecy reveals that it is not God, but Rome that tried to tamper with the sacredness of the seventh day of the week (and they openly claim this in their catechism. This is no secret).

Outside the Bible we find more evidence. In many languages today (take Spanish as an example), the day for Saturday (Sábado) is the same word as the Sabbath (Sábado). The weekly cycle has also never been disrupted.

The evidence that many Christians cite today for sacredness of Sunday is the event of the resurrection of Jesus that first day of the week a long time ago. How does the Bible say how we should commemorate the resurrection? Romans 6 says that the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus is symbolized by the water baptism of every Christian believer.

The evidence is clear. Of the five possibilities, only one stands the test of investigation. The Sabbath has always been a specific day of the week.

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